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Jerry Mahoney

Jerry Mahoney

Unknown“How to Talk to Your Children About Gay Parents, by a Gay Parent” by Jerry Mahoney is an awesome post, informative and a must read for people who are uncomfortable or unwilling to talk about gay parents/ couples.

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Butt Rash?

There’s almost nothing sadder than a baby with horrible diaper rash-they cry, they scream, and they stiffen up like a board when you try to, ever-so-gentily, wipe their bottom.

Unknown-1Best Solutions:  I personally like to let baby/toddler lay or walk around the house Winnie the Pooh style, that is diaperless. Obviously the risk factor is you might end up with poop or pee on the ground, or on you.  To avoid this take baby or toddler to the toilet directly after feedings, you can kind of use the elimination communication practice.  I recommend throwing on clothes you don’t care much about. If you have carpeting or rugs try to keep them out of those rooms, hardwood or tile will be much easier to clean!  If your baby isn’t crawling or walking, and you want to lay her down, put down a clean, old blanket or towel so she can get some comfy floor time. Besides for the possible accidents, the diaperless method works the best, especially for the more severe rashes.

Boudreaux’s Butt Paste:  This stuff works pretty well, it weirds me out, just a little, because it’s so thick, but it works! You can also do a combination of the paste and naked bottom.

Prevention:  The best way to prevent a rash is by frequently changing your little one’s diaper. Many parent’s I know comment that their children get the most rashes when they spend a full day with grandparents.  I’m definitely not dissing the G-parents, but remember that it’s ok to remind them to change diapers, they might forget because it’s been a long time since they had to do it.  Just casually, not bitterly, remind your parents or in-laws to change them.  You can even blame it on yourself, “I find myself forgetting to change his diaper every 2 hours or so, time just flies and then all of the sudden his diaper is full and his bum it bright red!”

Baby-Led Stories

Here is another verbal tip for both parents and caregivers: Ask your children, or the children you care for to tell you a story, sing you a song or “read” a book to you.  All of these things give them a free-range opportunity to use their language skills and stimulates imagination. An added plus is it gives parents and caregivers a verbal break, but stay alert!  Listen to what your kid is saying, and ask them questions about it when they are done, make them know you care and hear them.

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Wise Words from Kitzinger

“Babies speak a language that needs to be learned.  And with each baby you need to start discovering this one’s special language.  It takes time.  Meanwhile there us confusion, and irritation that the baby’s messages are not clearer, and that your own efforts to understand are not appreciated.  You have read books about child care, but somehow the baby is not playing by the rules. Remember that, though you are trying your best, your baby has not read the same books.”- Sheila Kitzinger (The Year After Childbirth)

Splinters

When your baby or toddler gets a splinter, first, don’t panic. It’s just a splinter. Second, deal with it, don’t let the splinter stick around.  Don’t force it out with tweezers, or dig at it with a needle the way you might with yourself.

Instead of digging around in your child’s skin with tweezers use a warm washcloth to ease the splinter out.  Tweezers can push the splinter and bacteria deeper in, and cause unnecessary pain.

Press a warm and clean washcloth over the skin where the splinter is, and try to hold the cloth there for 5 minutes if possible.  Repeat this multiple times in the day until the splinter emerges.  If your child gets frustrated from this, take a break.

Bath-time is a great opportunity to sneak this in; your child will be distracted and also isolated to the tub, making it easier for you.  If it isn’t bath-time, just plop your kid in anyway, they’ll enjoy just playing in the tub.